Arctic Change 2014

8-12 December - Ottawa Convention Centre - Ottawa, Canada

Student Day

Please join us for the International Arctic Change 2014 Student Day, an event that is expected to be one of the largest international gatherings of students engaged in Arctic research. Organized jointly by the ArcticNet Student Association (ASA) and the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS), the event will be held on 8 and 9 December 2014 at the Ottawa Convention Centre.

Student Day will provide an exciting opportunity for students from around the world to build and strengthen relationships, partake in dynamic discussions and learn from each other’s research experiences. Student Day is open to all interested individuals and we welcome the participation of students, researchers and representatives from northern communities, Inuit organizations, government and industry.

Student Day Program

Monday 8 December
13h15-13h30 Opening Remarks
Terin Robinson (President, ArcticNet Student Association)
13h30-14h00 Plenary #1: Fostering International Partnerships
Arctic initiatives, in science or in policy, always involve working with international partners. Keeping Student Day's 2014 theme of cooperation in mind, this plenary talk given by Dr. David Carlson (currently Director of the World Climate Research Programme) will explore the importance and challenges of building and maintaining international partnerships during an Arctic project. Dr. Carlson will also offer his personal insight from his own career on how establishing and sustaining these lasting relationships can foster a successful future working in Arctic research and with Arctic communities
14h00-15h00 Student Elevator Pitch Talks
15h00-15h10 A brief introduction to the Polar Data Catalogue
Dr. Julie E. Friddell (Manager, Canadian Cryospheric Information Network/Polar Data Catalogue)
Claire Elliott (ArcticNet Student Association Network Liaison)
The Polar Data Catalogue is the online data repository for ArcticNet science. This presentation will be a quick overview of the PDC and our website. Students will be introduced to the datasets found within the Catalogue and will be shown how to contribute their own data to the database.
15h10-15h30 Coffee Break
15h30-16h00 Plenary #2: ADAPT as a model of project-level collaboration
The ADAPT (Arctic Development and Adaptation to Permafrost in Transition) project is a success story when it comes to bringing together researchers from across Canada to cooperate and work together with the goal of answering key questions about the impacts of thawing permafrost. The invited speakers for this session are Dr. Warwick Vincent, leader of ADAPT and scientific director of the CEN (Centre d'Études Nordiques) at Laval University, and Dr. Mickaël Lemay, ADAPT coordinator and lead coordinator of the Integrated Regional Impact Studies (IRIS) conducted by ArcticNet. In this talk, you will learn about how ADAPT has united 15 laboratories in our country. Our speakers will explain why cooperation and collaboration are necessary to advance science and understanding of the natural world, and provide strategies on how to form and foster research partnerships and professional relationships.
16h00-17h30 Panel Discussion
Cooperation is a key component of research in the Arctic. Our panel discussion this year will explore how cooperation can benefit your research as well as some of the ways having to cooperate with others can provide considerable challenges. Our panelists come from a variety of Arctic backgrounds ranging from research to management to industry in order to provide a variety of perspectives.

Tuesday 9 December
08h15-08h30 Opening Remarks
Terin Robinson (President, ArcticNet Student Association)
08h30-09h00 Plenary #3: Cooperation in Community Research
Dr. Stephen J. Insley (Research Scientist, Wildlife Conservation Society Canada WSC - Canada)
How can researchers and communities build partnerships for mutually beneficial outcomes? Various types of research being conducted in the Arctic may be relevant to many communities, therefore cooperation between science and northern communities is vital. Cooperation is a key component for fostering networks of understanding and respect when working with, within, and around Arctic communities.
09h00-10h00 Concurrent Workshops:

Polar Data Catalogue
Room 201
The Polar Data Catalogue is the online data repository for ArcticNet science. Students interested in data management and collaborative data-sharing will be given the opportunity to learn more about the PDC in a hands-on session. The attendees will be taken step-by-step through the process of searching for and downloading data from the Catalogue, as well as how to upload their own data to the database. Students will be encouraged to participate in a discussion on data management and data-sharing initiatives. Personal laptops are encouraged for session.

Professionalism in media: making your research accessible to the public (Part 1)
Room 202
Mentor: Elizabeth Monier-Williams, Director Marketing & Communications, MaRS Innovation
Increasingly, researchers are being tasked to speak about the results of their work with audiences external to the academy. It's a very common requirement on grant applications, for example. But how do you do that? Are all social media platforms created equal? Where does your institution figure into the equation? We'll cover the best practices, tips, tricks and pitfalls for researchers who want to share their work.

Navigating Northern Research : Inuit Research Advisor's Guide to Research in the Canadian North
Room 203
The Inuit Research Advisors (IRAs), which are located in each of the four arctic regions, assist and collaborate with both researchers and Inuit on northern research. They invite you to attend their workshop to learn skills and culturally appropriate approaches to working with communities on a research project. The IRAs would like to help you be fully prepared for a trip to a northern community and take you through a step by step guide on how to confidently conduct research in the Canadian north.

10h00-10h30 Coffee Break
10h30-12h00 Student Elevator Pitch Talks
12h00-13h30 Lunch (provided)
13h30-14h30 Concurrent Workshops

Community Cooperative Research Roundtable
Room 203
Mentors: Jennie Knopp (PhD Candidate, Program Coordinator, Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Joint Secretariat, Community-Based Monitoring Program); Kendra Tingmiak (Program Assistant, Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Joint Secretariat, Community-Based Monitoring Program); Sonja Ostertag (Post Doctoral Fellow at the Freshwater Institute, Department of Fisheries and Oceans); Verna Pokiak (Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories Whale Monitor with the Inuvialuit Settlement Region Beluga Monitoring program); Sarah Jancke (Vice-President of the National Inuit Youth Council, Kitikmeot Inuit Association, Nunavut)
As a researcher in a foreign field, have you ever wondered about the best way to approach northern communities when conducting your research? Come take part in an exchange between researchers and their community connections of ideas and best practices for working in and with communities, specifically how to communicate your research with communities that may be directly or indirectly involved

Professionalism in media: making your research accessible to the public (Part 2)
Room 202
Mentor: Elizabeth Monier-Williams, Director Marketing & Communications, MaRS Innovation
Your research is complete and you're ready to talk about it through social media. Time to go viral! High fives all around. But -- what exactly are you going to share? Having a solid content strategy, which includes identifying discrete and connected audio/visual media assets, will help you consistently share interesting content with your connected audience. We'll cover strategic planning, storyboarding and what "going viral" really means.

Writing workshop: Using narrative structure to communicate more effectively
Room 201
Mentor: ASA led & Sabrina Doyle (Social Media Editor, Canadian Geographic)
Collaborating successfully in the professional world requires you to communicate effectively with both your partners as well as broader audiences. One of the oldest known forms of communication is storytelling. Often however, we as researchers forget that we can use storytelling and narrative structure to better present our findings to others outside of our own given disciplines. This workshop aims to guide you through the process of using narrative structure in your scientific writing as a means of making your story stand out in a crowd.

The Drum – a community themed networking activity
Room Canada Hall - 301
Mentor: Kathleen Snow
The Drum unites, involves, teaches and carries a sense of belonging that can be used as a tool for research in the northern regions of the globe. The Drum will be used to convey cultural ideals and illustrate how researchers and northerners can take the teachings of the Drum to communicate, collaborate and create a sense of community. Participants will learn the uses and history of the Drum and utilize the knowledge to relate to their specific goals and objectives.

14h30-15h00 Plenary #4: Cold War or Cold Peace?
Journalists like to portray an Arctic on the brink of war, as great powers and mega-corporations jockey for control over rich resources and new shipping routes. But does this portrayal match reality in a region where Russia has recently negotiated maritime boundaries with the United States and Norway and where the Arctic Council has become an active and innovative form of regional governance -- one that includes the direct participation of the Arctic indigenous peoples? In this plenary session, Michael Byers will provide an alternative vision of the present and future Arctic. Dr. Byers holds the Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law at the University of British Columbia. He is a project leader with ArcticNet and the author of International Law and the Arctic, which won the $50,000 Donner Prize for the best book on Canadian public policy.
15h00-15h30 Coffee Break
15h30-16h00 ArcticNet Student Association Elections
16h00-17h00 Concurrent Workshops

Communicating Science
Room 202
Mentor: Grant Gilchrist (Adjunct Research Professor, Carleton University) and Margret Brady (Freelance writer, Program Manager of Science Journalism at Carleton University)
You finished an amazing project with great results, but now what? This discussion session will focus on different strategies for presenting your results to both the scientific community and the general public. Communicating effectively to both audiences is not only one of your responsibilities as a researcher, but is also important for ensuring your results are heard by the largest possible audience.

Polar Data Catalogue
Room 201
The Polar Data Catalogue is the online data repository for ArcticNet science. Students interested in data management and collaborative data-sharing will be given the opportunity to learn more about the PDC in a hands-on session. The attendees will be taken step-by-step through the process of searching for and downloading data from the Catalogue, as well as how to upload their own data to the database. Students will be encouraged to participate in a discussion on data management and data-sharing initiatives. Personal laptops are encouraged for session.

Navigating Northern Research : Inuit Research Advisor's Guide to Research in the Canadian North
Room 203
The Inuit Research Advisors (IRAs), which are located in each of the four arctic regions, assist and collaborate with both researchers and Inuit on northern research. They invite you to attend their workshop to learn skills and culturally appropriate approaches to working with communities on a research project. The IRAs would like to help you be fully prepared for a trip to a northern community and take you through a step by step guide on how to confidently conduct research in the Canadian north.

17h00-17h15 Closing Remarks
Terin Robinson (President, ArcticNet Student Association)
17h15-19h00 Poster Session
19h00 Evening Social
Patty Boland's Irish Pub & Eatery
101 Clarence St, Ottawa, ON K1N 5P5, Canada
Map