Student Day

Please join us for the 10th annual ArcticNet Student Day, one of the largest gatherings of students engaged in Arctic research. Organized by the ArcticNet Student Association (ASA) in collaboration with the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS), the event will be held on 7 and 8 December 2015 at The Westin Bayshore.

Student Day will provide an exciting opportunity for students to build and strengthen professional relationships, partake in dynamic discussions and learn from each other’s research experiences. Student Day is open to all interested individuals and the participation of students and researchers and representatives from northern communities, Inuit organizations, government and industry is welcomed.

Student Day will be held over 2 days, starting at 08:30 on Monday, 7 December and continuing until 12:00 on Tuesday, 8 December. The theme for this year's Student Day is "Guiding personal and professional development for early-career Arctic researchers". The plenary talks and workshops will focus on helping students further develop the skills they need to succeed during their studies and better prepare them for a career following degree completion. The program will also include an icebreaker event, "elevator pitches" to promote student research, and a networking/social evening. Please check back in the fall for more details. We are looking forward to welcoming you!

Partners

Student Day Program

MONDAY, 7 DECEMBER

08:30 - 09:00
Welcome Remarks/Icebreaker
Terin Robinson, President, ArcticNet Student Association
09:00 - 10:00
Plenary #1: Sun, Surf and Snow: A Historian’s Account of How Arctic Exploration Shapes Contemporary Scientific Research in Canada
Glenn Stein, Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, Polar & Maritime Historian

Glenn Stein, polar and maritime historian with more than 40 years of research experience, will share why and how he got into his career choice and provide a fascinating overview of how Arctic exploration took place hand-in-hand with scientific research in Canada. More than just a history lesson, this talk will aim to reignite a passion for research and highlight why tales from the past are still relevant in our current pursuit of scientific knowledge. Through storytelling and personal experiences, Glenn will speak directly to students on what skills are needed to be successful in any profession, motivate our young researchers with encouraging anecdotes to help them through their studies, and offer advice on how to pursue their ideal choice of career.

10:00 - 10:30
Coffee Break
10:30 - 11:15

Workshop Sessions (1)
Salon ABC
The Research Mindset: Strategies on How to Think Critically About Your Research
Glenn Stein, Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, Polar & Maritime Historian

The ability to develop and continually sharpen critical thinking skills is vital for every researcher in any field of endeavor. The focus of this workshop will be to discuss the tools and strategies for the growth of critical and conceptual thinking in order to enhance the quality of their work. Students will learn how to better frame and structure research objectives and arguments, identify gaps or vulnerabilities in how their research is organized, and increase the overall persuasiveness and effectiveness of a research paper.

Oak
Collaborative Paper Writing and Questions of Co-Authorship
Philip Bonnaventure, Assistant Professor, University of Lethbridge

Working with other researchers is one of the foundations for an impactful paper. However as an early career scientists there are many questions regarding recognition of work and use of data. What merits co-authorship on a manuscript? What are the responsibilities and expectations of the first author? How do you handle issues of co-authorship and authorship order on projects with multiple collaborators? Can data presented in a collaborative paper be “recycled” for another publication? Our workshop mentor will address these concerns and discuss strategies on how to maintain open communication with your research group during the publishing process.

Seymour
How Researchers Can Maximize Engagement with Traditional Knowledge (TK) and Communities (Part 1)
Shelly Elverum, Ikaarvik: Barriers to Bridges; Mia Otokiak, Cambridge Bay; Coral Westwood, Kugluktuk; Andrew Arreak, Pond Inlet; Eric Solomon, Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre

Ikaarvik (2013 Arctic Inspiration Prize laureates) is a team of Inuit Mentors, community-based researchers and the Vancouver Aquarium that have developed workshops in collaboration with four Nunavut communities. Their goal is creating opportunities for northern communities and Arctic researchers to conduct better science based on identified community priorities, moving from community-based research to “community-driven research”. Northern experts from the Ikaarvik project, with Ikaarvik Coordinator Shelly Elverum, will lead discussions on the importance of southern researchers broadening their understanding and application of knowledge (in particular Inuit Knowledge or IQ) to create better, mutually beneficial relationships when working with Nunavut communities. Along the way, participants will identify the strengths of both IQ and science and explore how the two ways of knowing can be combined more effectively to research issues of concern in Arctic communities.

Mackenzie
Starting a Career in the Public Service Sector
Lisa Loseto, Section Head, Arctic Aquatic Research Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Dustin Whalen, Coastal Geologist, Natural Resources Canada

Working in public service, either on the provincial or federal level, is one of the many career paths following degree completion for graduate students. In this workshop, our mentor will discuss the types of jobs available, near-future job prospects for new graduates, where positions are posted, general requirements for applicants, what types of skills are needed/highly desired, and the benefits of working as a public servant.

11:15 - 12:00

Salon ABC
The Research Mindset: Strategies on How to Think Critically About Your Research
Glenn Stein, Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, Polar & Maritime Historian

The ability to develop and continually sharpen critical thinking skills is vital for every researcher in any field of endeavor. The focus of this workshop will be to discuss the tools and strategies for the growth of critical and conceptual thinking in order to enhance the quality of their work. Students will learn how to better frame and structure research objectives and arguments, identify gaps or vulnerabilities in how their research is organized, and increase the overall persuasiveness and effectiveness of a research paper.

Oak
Collaborative Paper Writing and Questions of Co-Authorship
Philip Bonnaventure, Assistant Professor, University of Lethbridge

Working with other researchers is one of the foundations for an impactful paper. However as an early career scientists there are many questions regarding recognition of work and use of data. What merits co-authorship on a manuscript? What are the responsibilities and expectations of the first author? How do you handle issues of co-authorship and authorship order on projects with multiple collaborators? Can data presented in a collaborative paper be “recycled” for another publication? Our workshop mentor will address these concerns and discuss strategies on how to maintain open communication with your research group during the publishing process.

Seymour
How Researchers Can Maximize Engagement with Traditional Knowledge (TK) and Communities (Part 2)
Shelly Elverum, Ikaarvik: Barriers to Bridges; Mia Otokiak, Cambridge Bay; Coral Westwood, Kugluktuk; Andrew Arreak, Pond Inlet; Eric Solomon, Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre

Ikaarvik (2013 Arctic Inspiration Prize laureates) is a team of Inuit Mentors, community-based researchers and the Vancouver Aquarium that have developed workshops in collaboration with four Nunavut communities. Their goal is creating opportunities for northern communities and Arctic researchers to conduct better science based on identified community priorities, moving from community-based research to “community-driven research”. Northern experts from the Ikaarvik project, with Ikaarvik Coordinator Shelly Elverum, will lead discussions on the importance of southern researchers broadening their understanding and application of knowledge (in particular Inuit Knowledge or IQ) to create better, mutually beneficial relationships when working with Nunavut communities. Along the way, participants will identify the strengths of both IQ and science and explore how the two ways of knowing can be combined more effectively to research issues of concern in Arctic communities.

Mackenzie
Starting a Career in the Public Service Sector
Lisa Loseto, Section Head, Arctic Aquatic Research Division, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Dustin Whalen, Coastal Geologist, Natural Resources Canada

Working in public service, either on the provincial or federal level, is one of the many career paths following degree completion for graduate students. In this workshop, our mentor will discuss the types of jobs available, near-future job prospects for new graduates, where positions are posted, general requirements for applicants, what types of skills are needed/highly desired, and the benefits of working as a public servant.

12:00 - 13:30
Lunch (Stanley Park Ballroom)
13:30 - 14:15

Workshop Sessions (2)
Salon ABC
Polar Data Catalogue: Data Management Workshop
Julie Friddell, Associate Director, Canadian Cryospheric Information Network/Polar Data Catalogue; Gabrielle Alix, Data Manager, Canadian Cryospheric Information Network/Polar Data Catalogue

Significant amounts of data and information are generated by ArcticNet research projects. It is important to share this wealth of knowledge by facilitating access and ensuring long-term archiving of those data. We will introduce students to polar research data management at the Polar Data Catalogue, ArcticNet’s chosen data and metadata repository. A workshop on data management principles, policies, and best practices will be followed by a discussion/question period on data management opportunities and challenges.

Oak
Leadership Foundations and the Educative Experience as Impetus for Action
Tim Straka, The University of British Columbia

Seymour
How Researchers Can Maximize Engagement with Traditional Knowledge (TK) and Communities (Part 1)
Shelly Elverum, Ikaarvik: Barriers to Bridges; Mia Otokiak, Cambridge Bay; Coral Westwood, Kugluktuk; Andrew Arreak, Pond Inlet; Eric Solomon, Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre

Ikaarvik (2013 Arctic Inspiration Prize laureates) is a team of Inuit Mentors, community-based researchers and the Vancouver Aquarium that have developed workshops in collaboration with four Nunavut communities. Their goal is creating opportunities for northern communities and Arctic researchers to conduct better science based on identified community priorities, moving from community-based research to “community-driven research”. Northern experts from the Ikaarvik project, with Ikaarvik Coordinator Shelly Elverum, will lead discussions on the importance of southern researchers broadening their understanding and application of knowledge (in particular Inuit Knowledge or IQ) to create better, mutually beneficial relationships when working with Nunavut communities. Along the way, participants will identify the strengths of both IQ and science and explore how the two ways of knowing can be combined more effectively to research issues of concern in Arctic communities.

Mackenzie
“Let’s Talk Science” Education and Outreach Workshop
Isabel Deslauriers, Outreach Manager, Let's Talk Science Outreach

In this workshop, students and researchers will receive training on how to most effectively deliver hands-on science activities to youth of all ages (K-12). Guidance on using age-appropriate language, easy educational techniques, tips on classroom management, and tips on how to develop new hands-on activities based on a science concept of your choice will be included. We will discuss how you can use the resources provided by ArcticNet and Let’s Talk Science to support your outreach efforts in schools in all regions of Canada, including Northern Canada.

14:15 - 15:00

Salon ABC
Polar Data Catalogue: Data Management Workshop
Julie Friddell, Associate Director, Canadian Cryospheric Information Network/Polar Data Catalogue; Gabrielle Alix, Data Manager, Canadian Cryospheric Information Network/Polar Data Catalogue

Significant amounts of data and information are generated by ArcticNet research projects. It is important to share this wealth of knowledge by facilitating access and ensuring long-term archiving of those data. We will introduce students to polar research data management at the Polar Data Catalogue, ArcticNet’s chosen data and metadata repository. A workshop on data management principles, policies, and best practices will be followed by a discussion/question period on data management opportunities and challenges.

Oak
Leadership Foundations and the Educative Experience as Impetus for Action
Tim Straka, The University of British Columbia

Seymour
How Researchers Can Maximize Engagement with Traditional Knowledge (TK) and Communities (Part 2)
Shelly Elverum, Ikaarvik: Barriers to Bridges; Mia Otokiak, Cambridge Bay; Coral Westwood, Kugluktuk; Andrew Arreak, Pond Inlet; Eric Solomon, Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre

Ikaarvik (2013 Arctic Inspiration Prize laureates) is a team of Inuit Mentors, community-based researchers and the Vancouver Aquarium that have developed workshops in collaboration with four Nunavut communities. Their goal is creating opportunities for northern communities and Arctic researchers to conduct better science based on identified community priorities, moving from community-based research to “community-driven research”. Northern experts from the Ikaarvik project, with Ikaarvik Coordinator Shelly Elverum, will lead discussions on the importance of southern researchers broadening their understanding and application of knowledge (in particular Inuit Knowledge or IQ) to create better, mutually beneficial relationships when working with Nunavut communities. Along the way, participants will identify the strengths of both IQ and science and explore how the two ways of knowing can be combined more effectively to research issues of concern in Arctic communities.

Mackenzie
“Let’s Talk Science” Education and Outreach Workshop
Isabel Deslauriers, Outreach Manager, Let's Talk Science Outreach

In this workshop, students and researchers will receive training on how to most effectively deliver hands-on science activities to youth of all ages (K-12). Guidance on using age-appropriate language, easy educational techniques, tips on classroom management, and tips on how to develop new hands-on activities based on a science concept of your choice will be included. We will discuss how you can use the resources provided by ArcticNet and Let’s Talk Science to support your outreach efforts in schools in all regions of Canada, including Northern Canada.

15:00 - 15:30
Coffee Break
15:30 - 16:15
Student Elevator Pitch Presentations
16:15 - 17:00
Plenary #2: Collaboration for Research Success
Melissa Lafrenière, Associate Professor, Queen's University and Director of the Facility for Biogeochemical Research on Environmental Change and the Cryosphere

The need for collaboration in research across multiple disciplines and specializations has become increasingly important with the awareness that the Arctic functions as a system. The connections between the air, water, land and ice, and all organisms inhabiting and functioning in these environments are complex and requires a wealth of knowledge to understand. Melissa Lafreniere a Principal investigators from the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory (CBAWO) will speak about how research has evolved at this site over the past decade to include hydrologists, atmospheric scientists, geomorphologists, permafrost modelers, biologists, and several other academic disciplines. She will also discuss the key benefits and challenges associated with collaborative work. The objectives of this talk are to help students consider the broader implications of their research (how can the scientific community as a whole benefit from what I am doing?) and to encourage them to use the ArcticNet ASM as a forum for establishing meaningful research connections.

19:00
Evening Social (Mahony & Sons)

TUESDAY, 8 DECEMBER

08:30 - 09:15
Plenary #3: Students on Ice: Driven by Passion for the Polar Regions
Geoff Green, Founder, Students on Ice

Established in 2000, Students on Ice (SOI) is an organization with the mandate to educate youth about the importance of the Polar Regions, to support their continued growth and to inspire initiatives that contribute to global sustainability. SOI is globally recognized as the world’s pioneer in educational youth expeditions and leader in Polar Education. Founder Geoff Green will speak on what inspired him to found the organization and how the program has evolved over the past 15 years to what it is today. Geoff will discuss the merits of youth education, mentorship and developing partnerships. This talk is not to be missed and guaranteed to be captivating as our guest speaker shares personal stories of how to transform a vision into reality.

09:15 - 10:00
Student Elevator Pitch Presentations
10:00 - 10:30
Coffee Break
10:30 - 11:15

Workshop Sessions (3)
Salon ABC
Considering Elements of Scientific Mentorship: Mistakes Made and Lessons Learned
Grant Gilchrist, Research Scientist, Environment Canada

When I was a graduate student, I really enjoyed when scientists were invited to the University to give Departmental seminars about their work. While enjoying their talks, I also felt discouraged because their work was interesting, often elegant, and their findings almost always ‘significant’ (both literally and figuratively). My thesis was anything but that. How was their level of success achieved? When I pursued my own research after graduating I realized there was a lot more to be learned and that I was ill-prepared to lead a science team. I want to let you in on some tips; several which may be intuitive, some that might surprise you, and all of which you need to know. This seminar is meant to be an informal examination of what it takes to initiate, maintain, and grow an efficient science team. I draw on my own experiences from working in the Arctic, with an emphasis on the mistakes I’ve made and the fact that several of my accomplishments occurred by accident. I also want to leave young scientists considering how the demands of modern academia in Canada often run counter to both ethical leadership approaches as well as healthy relationships, but importantly, that it doesn’t have to be that way.g, often elegant, and their findings almost always ‘significant’ (both literally and figuratively). My thesis was anything but that. How was their level of success achieved? When I pursued my own research after graduating I realized there was a lot more to be learned and that I was ill-prepared to lead a science team. I want to let you in on some tips; several which may be intuitive, some that might surprise you, and all of which you need to know. This seminar is meant to be an informal examination of what it takes to initiate, maintain, and grow an efficient science team. I draw on my own experiences from working in the Arctic, with an emphasis on the mistakes I’ve made and the fact that several of my accomplishments occurred by accident. I also want to leave young scientists considering how the demands of modern academia in Canada often run counter to both ethical leadership approaches as well as healthy relationships, but importantly, that it doesn’t have to be that way.

Oak
Research Proposal Development and Scholarship Applications
Ashley Cunsolo Willox, Canada Research Chair and Assistant Professor, Cape Breton University; Brent Else, Assistant Professor, University of Calgary

Adequate and appropriate support (e.g. ethics and research licenses, securing funding, and establishing research partnerships) is essential for research in the north. Research proposals are important in clearly communicating research objectives in the early phases of research to ensure these objectives are met. This workshop will allow students to develop the necessary skills in planning and preparing strong research proposals and applications according to their research interests and audiences. Under the guidance of experienced workshop leaders, students will work through examples of successful and unsuccessful research applications. Focus groups will include proposal and scholarship reviewers and students holding scholarship awards who will share their experiences.

Seymour
Writing and Publishing in Peer Reviewed Publications
Trevor Bell, Professor, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Greg Henry, Professor, The University of British Columbia

Facilitators will talk about the importance and objective of each section in a scientific paper, strategies on how to develop an effective title and abstract, the submission process (journal selection, requirements, common errors and turnaround time etc.) and how to handle reviews. Ethics in publishing will also be discussed and include topics such as data effectiveness, duplication and co-authorship considerations.

Mackenzie
“Let’s Talk Science” Education and Outreach Workshop
Isabel Deslauriers, Outreach Manager, Let's Talk Science Outreach

In this workshop, students and researchers will receive training on how to most effectively deliver hands-on science activities to youth of all ages (K-12). Guidance on using age-appropriate language, easy educational techniques, tips on classroom management, and tips on how to develop new hands-on activities based on a science concept of your choice will be included. We will discuss how you can use the resources provided by ArcticNet and Let’s Talk Science to support your outreach efforts in schools in all regions of Canada, including Northern Canada.

11:15 - 12:00

Workshop Sessions (3)
Salon ABC
Considering Elements of Scientific Mentorship: Mistakes Made and Lessons Learned
Grant Gilchrist, Research Scientist, Environment Canada

When I was a graduate student, I really enjoyed when scientists were invited to the University to give Departmental seminars about their work. While enjoying their talks, I also felt discouraged because their work was interesting, often elegant, and their findings almost always ‘significant’ (both literally and figuratively). My thesis was anything but that. How was their level of success achieved? When I pursued my own research after graduating I realized there was a lot more to be learned and that I was ill-prepared to lead a science team. I want to let you in on some tips; several which may be intuitive, some that might surprise you, and all of which you need to know. This seminar is meant to be an informal examination of what it takes to initiate, maintain, and grow an efficient science team. I draw on my own experiences from working in the Arctic, with an emphasis on the mistakes I’ve made and the fact that several of my accomplishments occurred by accident. I also want to leave young scientists considering how the demands of modern academia in Canada often run counter to both ethical leadership approaches as well as healthy relationships, but importantly, that it doesn’t have to be that way.g, often elegant, and their findings almost always ‘significant’ (both literally and figuratively). My thesis was anything but that. How was their level of success achieved? When I pursued my own research after graduating I realized there was a lot more to be learned and that I was ill-prepared to lead a science team. I want to let you in on some tips; several which may be intuitive, some that might surprise you, and all of which you need to know. This seminar is meant to be an informal examination of what it takes to initiate, maintain, and grow an efficient science team. I draw on my own experiences from working in the Arctic, with an emphasis on the mistakes I’ve made and the fact that several of my accomplishments occurred by accident. I also want to leave young scientists considering how the demands of modern academia in Canada often run counter to both ethical leadership approaches as well as healthy relationships, but importantly, that it doesn’t have to be that way.

Oak
Research Proposal Development and Scholarship Applications
Ashley Cunsolo Willox, Canada Research Chair and Assistant Professor, Cape Breton University; Brent Else, Assistant Professor, University of Calgary

Adequate and appropriate support (e.g. ethics and research licenses, securing funding, and establishing research partnerships) is essential for research in the north. Research proposals are important in clearly communicating research objectives in the early phases of research to ensure these objectives are met. This workshop will allow students to develop the necessary skills in planning and preparing strong research proposals and applications according to their research interests and audiences. Under the guidance of experienced workshop leaders, students will work through examples of successful and unsuccessful research applications. Focus groups will include proposal and scholarship reviewers and students holding scholarship awards who will share their experiences.

Seymour
Planning for a Successful Field Season
Dustin Whalen, Coastal Geologist, Natural Resources Canada

What to bring? What to wear? How to survive? Are just some of the questions that have to be asked when conducting field work in the Canadian Arctic. There is a fine line between the excitement of new scientific discovery and the reality of remote Arctic conditions. Knowing what to expect and how to adapt to sudden changes in weather, logistics and equipment performance goes a long way to develop a successful field program.

Mackenzie
“Let’s Talk Science” Education and Outreach Workshop
Isabel Deslauriers, Outreach Manager, Let's Talk Science Outreach

In this workshop, students and researchers will receive training on how to most effectively deliver hands-on science activities to youth of all ages (K-12). Guidance on using age-appropriate language, easy educational techniques, tips on classroom management, and tips on how to develop new hands-on activities based on a science concept of your choice will be included. We will discuss how you can use the resources provided by ArcticNet and Let’s Talk Science to support your outreach efforts in schools in all regions of Canada, including Northern Canada.

12:00 - 13:30
Lunch (Stanley Park Ballroom)